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War Heroes, Counts, Magistrates, and Lunatics…thanks Ancestry.com! June 16, 2017

Posted by Chris Mark in Uncategorized.
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EHM_graveI grew up in a broken home and had little interest or knowledge of my genetic family when I was growing up.  Until recently there were few ways to trace one’s lineage with any degree of accuracy.  In 2010 I joined Ancestry.com.  it was still pretty nascent and I didn’t get much value from the limited information available.  Last week I had an epiphany and looked up the obituary of one of the grandparents with which I was familiar.  It had just enough information that I started looking.  I went back to Ancestry.com and BOOM! I was on fire!  In the 7 years I was away from Ancestry.com there were volumes of new information added!  In two days I found over 160 direct relatives.  I had always assumed my relatives had come to the US like many Irish immigrants during the Great Famine of 1845-1852.  I guessed (incorrectly) that my relatives were farming folk from Ireland.  The real story is much more interested!

The first relative I looked up was my maternal grandfather Emery Harry Montgomery.  He was a Colonel in the US Airforce (previously the Army Air Corps) and had served with distinction in WWII where he flew P-47s over Europe and was awarded 4 Air Medals and in 1944 earned a Distinguished Flying Cross!  Colonel Montgomery was the CO of the 2nd Jet squadron in the US and was killed in 1958 while flying an F80. (more…)

Hidden Film Restored- “Let There Be Light” ; John Huston Directed May 25, 2012

Posted by Chris Mark in Uncategorized.
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I just read this story and had to pass on.  In 1947 John Huston (director of Maltese Falcon, among others) directed a short film on solders returning from WWII and suffering from what was then called ShellShock.  It was a breakthrough in that it showed black and white solders mixing freely in therapy and sports and showed soldiers suffering from what we now call PTSD.  The film can be downloaded for FREE from the National Film Preservation Society: (more…)

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